Superimposed Profiles for Roadway Design

Multiple profiles displayed in one profile view is commonly used when designing roadways. There is typically a view for each profile – the left and right edge of pavement and the centerline of the road.

The profile view for the centerline of the road is identified as the designated profile view and the left and right edge profiles are superimposed. This allows you to see the profile’s horizontal and vertical aspects with reference to the stations along the centerline of the road. In this exhibit, we will use key civil elements – an alignment and a surface – then we will superimpose the pipe network and the pressure pipe network profiles.

Creating the Storm Sewer & Water Main

We have an existing surface and the alignment for the centerline of the road. We will add a Water Main and Storm Sewer. Start with a polyline, layout approximately where the Storm Sewer will be, select “Create Alignment” from “Object,” then select the polyline (see image 1). Create the Storm Sewer: under “Pipe Network” select “Create Pipe Network from Object” and select the alignment. In the dialog box, select the size of pipe, material, and structure (see image 2).

Create the Water Main: Start with a polyline and set it along the north edge of payment. Offset three feet in toward the center of the roadway. Under “Pipe Network,” select “Create Pressure Pipe Network from Object” and select the polyline. In the dialog, select the size of pipe and material with three feet of cover (see image 1). Adjust the pipe networks as needed and add the labels (see image 2).

Image 1

Image 2

Creating Profile Views

Create the individual profile views: Start with the centerline of the road, Citrus Leaf Lane (see image 3).

Image 3

You can add all pipe networks in the profile view (see image 4); however, we have the centerline of the road as the destinated profile view, and we will superimpose the Storm Sewer pipe network and the Water Main pressure network profiles. We want the profiles to be dynamically linked, and not static. We will not add the pipe networks at this time; continue and click on next to create the profile view (see image 5).

Image 4

Image 5

Create the profile view for the Storm Sewer as we did for the Citrus Leaf Lane and add the ‘STRM-CITRUS LEAF LN’ network (see image 6). Create the profile view. Select the profile, and in the property dialog box change the style to ‘Storm Profile,’ (see image 7).

Image 6

Image 7

Create the profile view for the Water Main as we did for the Storm Sewer, add the ‘WM-CITRUS LEAF LN’ network (see image 8). Create the profile view. Select the profile, and in the property dialog box, change the style to ‘Watr Profile,’ (see image 9).

Image 8

Image 9

All the profile views are created, (see image 10).

Image 10

Creating Superimposed Profiles

Under “Profiles,” select “Create Superimposed Profile” and select the profiles one at a time. Select “Storm Sewer profile” then select the “Citrus Leaf Lane Profile” view (the destinated profile view); click OK to accept the default units and accuracy and do the same for the Water Main (see image 11).

Image 11

The profiles for the Storm Sewer, (cyan dashed line), the Water Main, (blue dashed line) are superimposed on the centerline of the road Citrus Leaf Lane (red dashed line) profile view. We see the horizontal and vertical aspects for each profile, and in the relationship to one another. Add the pipes, structures, and labels (see image 12).

Image 12

Superimposed profile option helps us understand the relationship of the profiles on one profile view.

Yvonne Musso

Civil Technical Specialist

About Yvonne

Yvonne has over 15 years of experience in the AEC industry. Her career path follows her passion for creativity and art along with the appreciation for our earth and ingenuity. She enjoys working in the AEC arena and any idea, drawing and building fascinates her.

She has an Associate of Applied Science in Fashion/Illustration Design, Graphics/TV Art, Computer Drafting and Design, and Architectural Drafting and Design. She has taken upon herself to learn, use and explore the many software applications that assist creative endeavors, including AutoCAD and Civil 3D. She is a highly motivated team player that loves to support and mentor others in the software and is an active member of Autodesk User Group International (AUGI).

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